The Best Art Instagram Accounts to Follow During Armory Week

This is the first year in about a decade that I won’t be able to make it to Armory Show or any of the other Armory week art fairs in the city. I’m very excited for my ski vacation in Colorado, but I’m sad to be missing out on all of the art parties and fun back home. To help cure my FOMO I am following these instagram accounts by some of the art-world’s best and most influential players. If you’re not in NYC, you should follow along too!

@vajiajiaJiaJia Fei
@vajiajia

Rule

@simondepurySimon de Pury
@simondepury

Rule

@blouin_artinfoBlouin Artinfo
@blouin_artinfo

Rule

@artsyArtsy
@artsy

Friday Fave: Last Night’s After-Hours Party at MoMA

Moma Party

I went to MoMA last night and partied with Roy Lichtenstein, Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, and Willem de Kooning. I hung out with Claude Monet, Salvador Dali, and Jasper Johns. And I sipped Chardonnay with Jackson Pollack, Robert Rauschenberg, and Andy Warhol.

The occasion was MoMA’s Junior Associates event. The museum kept all of its galleries open until 10 o’clock, hired a DJ to spin music, and organized an open bar and passed nibbles for everyone. The best part about it all? Leaving work and spending three blissful hours exploring the museum with a group of strangers who wanted to spend their evening exploring the museum too.

As an art history major, I have spent countless hours at museums, galleries, art fairs, and artists studios. I love being around art and getting excited by it. But now that I’m a busy worker bee, I’m lucky if I can get to a museum or gallery once a month–or even once every few months! Last night was a major treat for me. It reminded me to prioritize doing things that make me happy, and now I hope it will remind you too.

Gallery Hopping: Helmut Lang at Sperone Westwater, and More Must-See Exhibits

A View From The Top: The opening reception for Helmut Lang's sculptures exhibit at Sperone Westwater
View From The Top: The scene at Helmut Lang’s art opening at Sperone Westwater last night.

Helmut Lang’s columnar sculptures line the walls of Sperone Westwater in an army of clusters. Lang created the works while reflecting on his career as a fashion designer, taking a medley of old fabrics, zippers, buttons, and other items, stuffing them in casting tubes and molding them in resin and pigment. The result are visceral pillars that are strong and imposing, but at the same time battered and vulnerable. They transform his old working materials while also preserving them in time.

Helmut Lang’s sculptures are on view now through February 21.

Sperone Westwater: 257 Bowery, NYC

Complete your gallery hop by visiing these other shows that opened this week.

Katsura Okada: Apetalous II: New Works of Flowers Having No Petals, at A.I.R. Gallery

Katsura Okada Apetalous II at Air Gallery _on Bona Style
Katsura Okada, Pistil & Stamen of Hibiscus, 2014. Powdered golden pigments and liquid adhesive on handmade paper.

Katsura Okada reflects on life in Japan after the Tohoku Earthquake of 2011, depicting flowers in their most abstract and fragile form. Her paintings are on view through February 1.
A.I.R. Gallery: 111 Front Street, Brooklyn

 

Kellyann Burns at McKenzie Fine Art

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Kellyann Burns, 11:22 AM 5/22/13, 2013. Oil on alu-dibond, 40″ x 30″

Kellyann Burns layers pigments on top of each other before scraping them off with with sandpaper and metal spatulas to reveal all new contrasting colors and surface textures. Her hard-edged, abstract paintings are on view through February 8.
McKenzie Fine Art: 55 Orchard Street, NYC

 

Adam Ekberg: Orchestrating the Ordinary, at ClampArt

Adam Ekberg
Adam Ekberg, Eclipse.

Adam Ekberg’s staged still life photographs are straddle the line between real life and whimsy. His crisp, vibrant pictures are on view through February 14.
ClampArt: 535 West 25th Street, NYC

 

 

 

Gallery Hopping: Tonight’s Hottest New York Art Openings

Black, Blue, Silver and Gold, 2013 Oil on canvas, 132 x 132 in.
Black, Blue, Silver and Gold, 2013
Oil on canvas, 132 x 132 in.

Abstract expressionist Pat Steir uses gravity as a tool as she experiments with drips of paint and splatters of pigment at Cheim and Reid.
Opening reception from 6-8 p.m.: 547 West 25th Street
Pat Steir is on view through March 29.

Ran Hwang, Contemplation Time, 2014 Paper buttons, beads and pins on Plexiglas, 94 x 47 in.
Ran Hwang, Contemplation Time, 2014
Paper buttons, beads and pins on Plexiglas, 94 x 47 in.

Korean artist Ran Hwang finds Nirvana in luminescent shades and intricate materials in The Snowfall of Spiders at Leila Heller Gallery.
Opening reception from 6-8 p.m.: 568 West 25th Street.
Ran Hwang: The Snowfall of Spiders will be on view through March 21.

Kon Trubkovich at Marianne Boesky
Kon Trubkovich, Koltsevaya, 2014
Oil on linen, 54 x 47 in.

Kon Trubkovich renders our thoughts and manifests our memory through a series of paintings, video stills, and photographs in Kon Trubkovich: Snow at Marianne Boesky.
Opening reception from 6-8 p.m.: 509 West 24th Street.
Kon Trubkovich: Snow will be on view through March 22.

Gallery Hopping: Tonight’s Hottest New York Art Openings

Emil Lukas, Rain, 2013. Paint and ink on canvas over wood frame, 78 x 97 inches.
Emil Lukas, Rain, 2013, paint and ink on canvas over wood frame, 78 x 97 inches.

Emil Lukas experiments with sinuous lines and layers of larvae in Emil Lukas: Thread Paintings and Larvae Paintings, at Sperone Westwater.
Opening reception for the artist tonight from 6-8 p.m.: 257 Bowery
Emil Lukas will be on view through February 22.

Alex Prager, Crowd #9 (Sunset Five), 2013, archival print, 59.5 x 91.85 inches
Alex Prager, Crowd #9 (Sunset Five), 2013, archival print, 59.5 x 91.85 inches.

Alex Prager studies the contradictory emotions of people in Face in the Crowd, at Lehmann Maupin.
Opening reception for the artist tonight from 6-8 p.m., at both NYC locations: 540 West 26th Street and 201 Chrystie Street
Face in the Crowd will be on view through February 22.

Frank Stella, K. 144, 2013, ABS and steel, 76 x 97 x 49 inches
Frank Stella, K. 144, 2013, ABS and steel, 76 x 97 x 49 inches.

Frank Stella plays with technicolor shapes and synesthesia in Frank Stella: Recent Work, at Peter Freeman, Inc.
Opening reception for the artist tonight from 6-8 p.m.: 140 Grand Street
Frank Stella: Recent Work will be on view through February 22.

The Met Sparkles with “Jewels By JAR”

JAR Poppy Brooch, 1982. Made of diamond, tourmalines, and gold. Photo courtesy of JAR, Paris.
JAR Poppy Brooch, 1982. A diamond, tourmalines, and gold. All photos courtesy of JAR, Paris.

Thanks to Joel Arthur Rosenthal, the passionate jewelry designer behind JAR, the fashion world is a much more dazzling place. For the past 35 years, Rosenthal has diligently studied and collected gemstones, hand crafting fine, one-of-a-kind pieces at his atelier on the Place Vendôme in Paris, and attracting a loyal following of affluent and fashionable clients like Diane von Furstenberg, Elizabeth Taylor, and Jo Carole Lauder.

Now we can all appreciate JAR’s sparkling artistry and zeal by visiting “Jewels by JAR,” the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s magnificent display of more than 400 pieces made by the bling master himself.

JAR’s fascination with flora and fauna shine through the Met’s exhibit, as does his prowess of pavé, and his affinity for mixing precious stones with under-appreciated, natural metals such as titanium, aluminum, and steel. During a press preview for the exhibit earlier this week, curator Jane Adlin touched on the designer’s use of unexpected materials. “JAR mixes fine, perfect gemstones with stones of lesser quality, but the outcome is an extraordinary piece of jewelry.” Each piece is more brilliant than the last.

For a mega-dose of razzmatazz à la JAR, visit the Met through March 9. Visit metmuseum.org for more information.

JAR Cameo and Rose Petal Brooch, 2011. Made of rubies, diamonds, silver, and gold. Courtesy of JAR, Paris.
JAR Cameo and Rose Petal Brooch, 2011. Rubies, diamonds, silver, and gold.
JAR Butterfly Brooch, 1994. Made of sapphires, fire opals, rubies, amethyst, garnets, diamonds, silver and gold. Courtesy of JAR, Paris.
JAR Butterfly Brooch, 1994. Sapphires, fire opals, rubies, amethyst, garnets, diamonds, silver, and gold.
JAR Zebra Brooch, 1987. Made of agate, diamonds, a sapphire, silver, and gold. Courtesy of JAR, Paris.
JAR Zebra Brooch, 1987. Agate, diamonds, a sapphire, silver, and gold.
JAR Tulip Brooch, 2008. Made of rubies, diamonds, pink sapphires, garnets, silver, gold, and enamel. Courtesy of JAR, Paris.
JAR Tulip Brooch, 2008. Rubies, diamonds, pink sapphires, garnets, silver, gold, and enamel.

Sharpie Chic: Isabella Huffington’s Polychromatic Art Exhibit at Ports 1961 in the Meatpacking District

Isabella Huffington's large-scale artwork replaces fashionable mannequins in the window of Ports 1961, in New York's Meatpacking District.
Isabella Huffington’s artwork replaces fashionable mannequins in the window of Ports 1961, in New York’s Meatpacking District.

Arianna Huffington’s daughter, Isabella, is not your typical college student. The Yale senior who majors in art history is also a talented artist with a particular passion for mixed media. Her works are so impressive that high-end fashion house Ports 1961 removed all inventory from its Meatpacking District store to hang a weeklong show of her most recent, large-scale, psychedelic pieces.

A perfectly coordinated display of purple accessories beside a purple collage.
A perfectly coordinated display of Ports 1961’s purple, white, and black accessories beside a collage of the same hues.

I met the sweet and soft-spoken artist at the exhibit’s opening on Thursday night. “I’m drawn to simple shapes and colors,” Isabella said, Continue reading “Sharpie Chic: Isabella Huffington’s Polychromatic Art Exhibit at Ports 1961 in the Meatpacking District”

“Henri Matisse: The Essence of Line” at Marlborough Gallery

Poésies de Stéphane Mallarmé, 1932, etching
Poésies de Stéphane Mallarmé, an etching made by Matisse in 1932.

The simplest things are often the most difficult to perfect. Henri Matisse once mused, “The effort needed to see things without distortion takes something very like courage; and this courage is essential to the artist, who has to look at everything as though he saw it for the first time…”

Indeed, the artist was courageous in his depictions of life, defying critics who viewed his artwork as being too decorative. As he grew older, Matisse became Continue reading ““Henri Matisse: The Essence of Line” at Marlborough Gallery”

Daniel Heidkamp’s “Sneeze Buds” at Half Gallery on East 78th Street

Daniel Heidkamp's Airplane, oil on linen, 2013.
Daniel Heidkamp’s Airplane, oil on linen, 2013.

The Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn seems a morbid spot for an artist to paint en plein air, but Daniel Heidkamp seems to find life in the subject nonetheless. “Sneeze Buds,” his current solo exhibit at Half Gallery on the Upper East Side, is a vibrant study of the lush greenery and pastel blooms that embellish the graveyard, with no visual references to death. Perhaps the artist’s lively depiction of the cemetery stems from the fact that it is the resting place for creative masters whose legacies will live on forever—among them, American graffiti artist Jean-Michel Basquiat and Charles Lewis Tiffany, jeweler and founder of Tiffany & Co.

“Sneeze Buds” is on view at Half Gallery  now through July 26.

Half Gallery: 43 East 78th Street, NYC

Takayuki Maekawa at Steven Kasher Gallery

Maekawa's Polar Bear, Churchill, Canada, November, 2000, archival pigment print.
Maekawa’s Polar Bear, Churchill, Canada, November, 2000, archival pigment print.

Japanese wildlife photographer Takayuki Maekawa has no qualms about chasing black bears in Alaska or stalking gorillas in Uganda, as long as it means capturing the animal kingdom’s most intimate and magnificent moments. Tomorrow is the last day to view his vibrant color photographs at Steven Kasher Gallery.

Click here for more information.